Politics

Political Participation After a Mass Protest Movement: Evidence from the Arab Spring

Nada Shalash, Boston University -- This paper explores the individual and social determinants of political engagement across the Middle East before and after the Arab Spring. Using the Arab Spring as an example of a mass uprising spanning multiple countries, I conduct a difference-in-differences analysis of socioeconomic determinants of political engagement in the Middle East.

Health Economics

Labor Market Performance During the COVID-19 Pandemic: State Policy, Compliance, and Social Behavior

Julian W. Klingen, Oberlin College -- The outbreak of the COVID-19 pandemic in late February 2020 in the United States constituted an unprecedented economic shock, in addition to the tragic loss of life, and sparked a rapidly growing literature on the economic implications. Exploiting county-level data in the U.S. from January - August 2020, this paper examines labor market performance in structurally similar counties situated along state borders that were exposed to varying degrees of nonpharmaceutical interventions.

Uncategorized

Saving Our Salmon: Understanding the Environmental Justifications for the Pacific Coastal Salmon Recovery Fund from an Economic Perspective

Rosie Albenice, University of Georgia -- This paper aims to understand the adversity faced by coho salmon and the ways government intervention can help maintain their population. The Oregon coast coho Evolutionary Significance Unit (ESU) consists of 21 independent salmon populations and 35 dependent populations, which have been receiving restoration treatment through the Pacific Coastal Salmon Recovery Fund since 2000. The following paper’s observations are derived from 2000 to 2014 data focused on the 21 independent populations within the Oregon coast coho ESU.

Announcements, Health Economics

Our Summer 2021 Issue

On behalf of the Comparative Advantage Editorial Board, we are pleased to present the ninth volume, summer issue, of Stanford University's undergraduate economics journal. This volume presents undergraduate work on a wide variety of topics, including environmental economics, political economy, and labor economics. Furthermore, as the COVID-19 pandemic continues to exact a toll on individuals… Continue reading Our Summer 2021 Issue

Law and Economics

Market Effects of Court Decisions: A Case Study of Antiquities at Auction in New York and London

Olivia Zitkus, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill -- The changing legal landscape of the market for ancient art provides an opportunity to study the impact of legal constraints on economic markets. Working with novel data from Sotheby’s and Bonhams auction houses and court decisions from London and New York between 2003 and 2019, I look for the effects of legal rulings and settlements on the art market.

Macroeconomics

Keystroke Money: Empirical Evidence From India (1999-2019)

Louis Lamaury, University of Leeds -- Since the revival of money supply endogeneity of the 1980s, post-Keynesian monetary theory has become increasingly accepted in central banking institutions. In developed economies, academia has paved the way forward through empirical research but has often neglected developing economies. This paper investigates the exogenous-endogenous money supply hypothesis in India from 1999 to 2019.

Uncategorized

Determinants of Alumni Giving to a Private U.S. College: Evidence from Oberlin College

Kenneth Kitahata, Oberlin College -- This paper studies the personal characteristics and factors that determine alumni giving, using a dataset from Oberlin College’s Office of Development from years 1974 – 2019. Using Logit and Tobit regression, I find that females, graduates, older alumni, married alumni, alumni whose spouse attended Oberlin, and having a higher GPA in college are associated with higher giving.

Health Economics

An Update on the Substitution between Alcohol and Marijuana: Evidence from the Legal Drinking Age and Medical Marijuana Laws

Stephen Kisty, University of Pittsburgh -- This paper attempts to update the analysis that utilizes a regression discontinuity design to examine the effect of increased availability of legal alcohol at age 21, caused by the minimum legal drinking age in the United States, on the consumption of marijuana (Crost and Guerrero, 2012).