Our Summer 2021 Issue

On behalf of the Comparative Advantage Editorial Board, we are pleased to present the ninth volume, summer issue, of Stanford University’s undergraduate economics journal. This volume presents undergraduate work on a wide variety of topics, including environmental economics, political economy, and labor economics. Furthermore, as the COVID-19 pandemic continues to exact a toll on individuals and healthcare systems worldwide, this volume may inform the debates … Continue reading Our Summer 2021 Issue

BLOG: Unemployment, Refugees, Asylum Seekers, and the 2008 Financial Crisis – An Analysis using Structural VAR and Dynamic Panel Models

Sarah von Bargen, Columbia University

This paper analyzes the relationships between refugee and asylum seeker flows, unemployment rates, and suicide rates using both structural vector autoregression and dynamic panel models. Specifically, structural VAR is initially used for analyzing data from 1980-2018 in the United States, and a random effects dynamic panel model is utilized for analyzing post-2008 financial crisis data of these four variables in the United States, France, and the United Kingdom. Continue reading BLOG: Unemployment, Refugees, Asylum Seekers, and the 2008 Financial Crisis – An Analysis using Structural VAR and Dynamic Panel Models

Analyzing the Effects of Unemployment on Political Polarization in New York State

By Mohammed Al-Khulaifi, Georgetown University School of Foreign Service

In this empirical research I attempt to investigate possible causation between the level of unemployment and the level of political polarization in New York State by county. I hypothesize that the increase in unemployment will lead to higher levels of political polarization following the intuition of political fanaticism grounded on economic distress. Continue reading Analyzing the Effects of Unemployment on Political Polarization in New York State

BLOG: The Impact of Minimum Wage Implementation on Women’s Earnings: Evidence from Malaysia

By May Lyn Cheah, University of California, Berkeley

This paper investigates the effect of the introduction of minimum wage legislation in Malaysia, which became effective from January 1, 2013 for employers with six employees or more, and was fully enforced by January 1, 2014 for all employers. The minimum wage ruling prescribed a rate of RM900 (ŨSD 230) per month for Peninsula Malaysia and RM800 (ŨSD 204) for Sabah, Sarawak and Wilayah Persekutuan Labuan. Continue reading BLOG: The Impact of Minimum Wage Implementation on Women’s Earnings: Evidence from Malaysia

BLOG: Employment Effects of Minimum Wage Increases – A Matched Pairs Design Using US Data

By Eric Karsten, Chong An Ong, Immanuel Adriana Rakshana, and Arushi Saksena, University of Chicago 

The minimum wage is a contentious issue, with proponents arguing that it is required to protect the wage security of low-income earners, and opponents arguing that it places downwards pressure on employment in the labor market. Our paper uses a differences in differences regression model, similar to the one used in Card & Krueger(1993) to estimate the unemployment effects of a minimum wage increase. Continue reading BLOG: Employment Effects of Minimum Wage Increases – A Matched Pairs Design Using US Data

BLOG: To Stay or Migrate? Preferences and Occupational Choice in China’s Rural Ethnic Tourism Industry

By Virginia Zhang, New York University

Though rural workers in China now have more opportunities for rural-urban migration, they still face uncertainties in urban labor markets. For many rural Chinese ethnic minority workers, … Continue reading BLOG: To Stay or Migrate? Preferences and Occupational Choice in China’s Rural Ethnic Tourism Industry

BLOG: Are Immigrants Taking Our Jobs? An Economic Analysis of Immigrant Laborers in American Poultry Farms

By Jacob L. Peterson. Ball State University

Immigrants are taking American jobs, but we are all better off because of it. In today’s political environment, immigrants are viewed as a burden… Continue reading BLOG: Are Immigrants Taking Our Jobs? An Economic Analysis of Immigrant Laborers in American Poultry Farms

Housing Demand and Labor Supply: The 1962 Algerian Repatriates to France

By Olivia Briffault. Yale University.

A surprising finding in analyses of the effects of immigration is that immigrants generally have a limited effect on local labor market outcomes. One reason that has been hypothesized is that immigration generates… Continue reading Housing Demand and Labor Supply: The 1962 Algerian Repatriates to France